cocreationnews:

Jeffrey Henning of Affinnova writes in Research about crowd-shaped surveys — the process of refining a survey as it is being conducted in response to previous answers — with examples of techniques that can be used and surveys that have employed them. For example:
Where crowd-sourced choice lists really come into their own is in laddering. In qualitative interviewing, the laddering technique involves continually probing on answers to open-ended questions in order to move discussion from features to benefits and from benefits to emotions. This approach is particularly difficult to automate.
BrainJuicer has come up with a solution to this called MindReader. The first respondent is asked to provide a number of examples. For instance a respondent might be asked about their mobile phone: “What three features are most important to you?” Subsequent respondents see the most frequently selected past choices and may enter their own…


We see a lot of this on the GutCheck tool, especially iterative development questions in our new IRCs. Love the idea of being flexible in qualitative interviewing — afterall, respondents are humans!

cocreationnews:

Jeffrey Henning of Affinnova writes in Research about crowd-shaped surveys — the process of refining a survey as it is being conducted in response to previous answers — with examples of techniques that can be used and surveys that have employed them. For example:

Where crowd-sourced choice lists really come into their own is in laddering. In qualitative interviewing, the laddering technique involves continually probing on answers to open-ended questions in order to move discussion from features to benefits and from benefits to emotions. This approach is particularly difficult to automate.

BrainJuicer has come up with a solution to this called MindReader. The first respondent is asked to provide a number of examples. For instance a respondent might be asked about their mobile phone: “What three features are most important to you?” Subsequent respondents see the most frequently selected past choices and may enter their own…

We see a lot of this on the GutCheck tool, especially iterative development questions in our new IRCs. Love the idea of being flexible in qualitative interviewing — afterall, respondents are humans!

(via socialintel)