"86% of Americans say they do not want “political advertising tailored to your interests.” 85% agreed “If I found out that Facebook was sending me ads for political candidates based on my profile information that I had set to private, I would be angry.”"

— That’s according to a recent Annenberg survey on political advertising // Will Online Political Targeting Generate a Voter Backlash? (via amzam)

(via npr)

Things I Do Not Understand And Definitely Am Not Going To Talk About

  • “Don’t Miss the Good Stuff”
  • “Star your close friends to see more of the important moments in their lives.”
  • “(Friends won’t know you’ve starred them.)”

thingsidontunderstandand

(via yrfriendliz)

Liking on Facebook from The Oatmeal
“It’s very useful to have some kind of feedback mechanism for your current client base,” says Zukowski. “The difficulty is in trying to reach the general population.”
Beyond the big social-media and survey names, Soman points to startups such as CrowdTap.com and GutCheckIt.com, which put researchers in instant contact with people from a given target group. Want to know what a woman earning US$100,000 per year and living in the U.S. Northeast thinks about your product? For US$40, GutCheckit.com can, within seconds, put you in touch with someone who meets these criteria. This service won’t correct for a poorly worded question, and it won’t put you in touch with Canadians. But it can go a long way toward homing in on the right sample.
Facebook doesn’t provide such a targeted demographic sample, says Brcic, so he takes his fans’ suggestions with a grain of salt: “If you rely on your fans too much and not on your own intuition, that can stunt your capacity to innovate.”
-“Market research through social networking has limits”, Canadian Business Magazine, Feb. 8, 2012

“It’s very useful to have some kind of feedback mechanism for your current client base,” says Zukowski. “The difficulty is in trying to reach the general population.”

Beyond the big social-media and survey names, Soman points to startups such as CrowdTap.com and GutCheckIt.com, which put researchers in instant contact with people from a given target group. Want to know what a woman earning US$100,000 per year and living in the U.S. Northeast thinks about your product? For US$40, GutCheckit.com can, within seconds, put you in touch with someone who meets these criteria. This service won’t correct for a poorly worded question, and it won’t put you in touch with Canadians. But it can go a long way toward homing in on the right sample.

Facebook doesn’t provide such a targeted demographic sample, says Brcic, so he takes his fans’ suggestions with a grain of salt: “If you rely on your fans too much and not on your own intuition, that can stunt your capacity to innovate.”

-“Market research through social networking has limits”, Canadian Business Magazine, Feb. 8, 2012

yrfriendliz:

jennydeluxe:

tl;dr: basically, when Facebook files for IPO tonight, it will be like Christmas morning for tech reporters.

I’m personally pretty interested in all this info, too. I think anyone currently working in tech or at a company that might have future dealings with Facebook, whether through applications, “social marketing,” or anything else, should probably care, too?

(Not to mention anyone who has any information shared on Facebook. I mean…. right?)

STUDY: ONLY 1% OF FACEBOOK FANS ENGAGE WITH BRANDS (via AdAge)
"I don’t think it’s a bad thing," said Karen Nelson-Field, senior research associate for Ehrenberg-Bass Institute who describes herself as a "Facebook advocate." "People need to understand what it can do for a brand and what it can’t do. Facebook doesn’t really differ from mass media. It’s great to get decent reach, but to change the way people interact with a brand overnight is just unrealistic." This research jibes with that thinking, as does a separate study from Ms. Nelson-Field looking at the distribution of buying behavior among Facebook fan bases. In that study, she used web-based consumer panels to examine the behavior of Facebook fans of two unnamed repeat-purchased brands, in the chocolate and soft-drink categories. The key finding was a much greater occurrence of heavy buyers in the Facebook population than in a more general population of customers. The study also found that purchase frequency didn’t increase after someone became a fan. In other words, Facebook fan bases skew toward heavy buyers rather than the more casual shoppers that a brands needs to reach in order to grow. Again, unless you’re someone who believes marketing on Facebook alone constitutes a full strategy or you’re lining up for the inevitable Facebook IPO, this isn’t all bad news. Facebook does provide good reach and its audience of loyal fans is good for market research and word-of-mouth advocacy.
 What do you think? How does your brand engage with its fans?  How, if at all, might this change the messaging a brand uses on Facebook posts?

STUDY: ONLY 1% OF FACEBOOK FANS ENGAGE WITH BRANDS (via AdAge)

"I don’t think it’s a bad thing," said Karen Nelson-Field, senior research associate for Ehrenberg-Bass Institute who describes herself as a "Facebook advocate." "People need to understand what it can do for a brand and what it can’t do. Facebook doesn’t really differ from mass media. It’s great to get decent reach, but to change the way people interact with a brand overnight is just unrealistic."

This research jibes with that thinking, as does a separate study from Ms. Nelson-Field looking at the distribution of buying behavior among Facebook fan bases. In that study, she used web-based consumer panels to examine the behavior of Facebook fans of two unnamed repeat-purchased brands, in the chocolate and soft-drink categories. The key finding was a much greater occurrence of heavy buyers in the Facebook population than in a more general population of customers. The study also found that purchase frequency didn’t increase after someone became a fan.

In other words, Facebook fan bases skew toward heavy buyers rather than the more casual shoppers that a brands needs to reach in order to grow. Again, unless you’re someone who believes marketing on Facebook alone constitutes a full strategy or you’re lining up for the inevitable Facebook IPO, this isn’t all bad news. Facebook does provide good reach and its audience of loyal fans is good for market research and word-of-mouth advocacy.


What do you think? How does your brand engage with its fans? How, if at all, might this change the messaging a brand uses on Facebook posts?

Could your tumblr get you hired?

Instead of asking for résumés, the New York venture-capital firm—which has invested in Twitter, Foursquare, Zynga and other technology companies—asked applicants to send links representing their “Web presence,” such as a Twitter account or Tumblr blog. Applicants also had to submit short videos demonstrating their interest in the position.


prostheticknowledge:

“Facebook Is The New Suburbia” by Hugh MacLeod (aka GapingVoid)

prostheticknowledge:

“Facebook Is The New Suburbia” by Hugh MacLeod (aka GapingVoid)

(via journo-geekery)

thenextweb:

This small clip from Seinfeld does an incredible job of explaining why Facebook, and frankly all social media, is such an irresistible life-resource hog. (via Jerry Seinfeld Explains Facebook’s Success in 1992!)