IDI or IRC?
Quality insights and quick insights don’t have to be at odds with each other…
Adam DiPaula, PhD recently contributed to the Greenbook blog regarding the increasing pressure to deliver faster and less expensive research results to clients. He noted that achieving both quality and speed at the same time can be problematic, and posed this question at the end of his article:
“Is it possible to deliver quality and speed, or do useful insights take time?”
 At GutCheck we see that our clients can have high-quality and quick insights both everyday.  Here’s why: 
1. Automated recruitment.  GutCheck takes the key burden of quickly finding the right person to interview – by being able to find that target consumer in an average of 2.3 minutes.
2. In turn, insights team members can focus their time on evaluating the results, and the quality of findings.  That’s because they don’t have to spend time trying to find respondents or waiting on third parties to recruit them.
3. Clients who use our platform can start to view results immediately as interviews are complete.  So a client can be looking at results on the same day as they start the project.  That gives them a big head start to focus on quality of the findings at the end of the project. 

Quality insights and quick insights don’t have to be at odds with each other…

Adam DiPaula, PhD recently contributed to the Greenbook blog regarding the increasing pressure to deliver faster and less expensive research results to clients. He noted that achieving both quality and speed at the same time can be problematic, and posed this question at the end of his article:

“Is it possible to deliver quality and speed, or do useful insights take time?”

 At GutCheck we see that our clients can have high-quality and quick insights both everyday.  Here’s why: 

  1. 1. Automated recruitment.  GutCheck takes the key burden of quickly finding the right person to interview – by being able to find that target consumer in an average of 2.3 minutes.
  2. 2. In turn, insights team members can focus their time on evaluating the results, and the quality of findings.  That’s because they don’t have to spend time trying to find respondents or waiting on third parties to recruit them.
  3. 3. Clients who use our platform can start to view results immediately as interviews are complete.  So a client can be looking at results on the same day as they start the project.  That gives them a big head start to focus on quality of the findings at the end of the project. 
We all know that maintaining a busy work life and healthy lifestyle is challenging.  At GutCheck, we conducted a three day Instant Research Community with over 35 respondents and probed for their insights on activities, brands and even celebrities that they pay attention to when thinking about living a healthy lifestyle.  Here are a couple of highlights from the community members:
* Respondents identified living a healthy lifestyle with many different brands.  In fact they mentioned nearly 50 national and regional brands collectively.  The challenge is any agreement on brands that do represent maintaining a healthy lifestyle consistently.  Kashi was the one brand that rose above the clutter, with 42% of respondents mentioning it specifically.  The next mentioned brand was Whole Foods with only 18%.
* Even those who actively try to live a healthy lifestyle find barriers to do so.  A third of respondents say that they frequently run out of time.  In addition, 21% said that their other family members kept them from keeping their health and wellness goals (can be spouse, children or older parents — but children were mentioned most often).  Another significant factor was the actual expense of staying healthy — most notably the price of organic food.
For more details on this Instant Research Community, please see the summary report.  Some great insights!

We all know that maintaining a busy work life and healthy lifestyle is challenging.  At GutCheck, we conducted a three day Instant Research Community with over 35 respondents and probed for their insights on activities, brands and even celebrities that they pay attention to when thinking about living a healthy lifestyle.  Here are a couple of highlights from the community members:

* Respondents identified living a healthy lifestyle with many different brands.  In fact they mentioned nearly 50 national and regional brands collectively.  The challenge is any agreement on brands that do represent maintaining a healthy lifestyle consistently.  Kashi was the one brand that rose above the clutter, with 42% of respondents mentioning it specifically.  The next mentioned brand was Whole Foods with only 18%.

* Even those who actively try to live a healthy lifestyle find barriers to do so.  A third of respondents say that they frequently run out of time.  In addition, 21% said that their other family members kept them from keeping their health and wellness goals (can be spouse, children or older parents — but children were mentioned most often).  Another significant factor was the actual expense of staying healthy — most notably the price of organic food.

For more details on this Instant Research Community, please see the summary report.  Some great insights!

cocreationnews:

Jeffrey Henning of Affinnova writes in Research about crowd-shaped surveys — the process of refining a survey as it is being conducted in response to previous answers — with examples of techniques that can be used and surveys that have employed them. For example:
Where crowd-sourced choice lists really come into their own is in laddering. In qualitative interviewing, the laddering technique involves continually probing on answers to open-ended questions in order to move discussion from features to benefits and from benefits to emotions. This approach is particularly difficult to automate.
BrainJuicer has come up with a solution to this called MindReader. The first respondent is asked to provide a number of examples. For instance a respondent might be asked about their mobile phone: “What three features are most important to you?” Subsequent respondents see the most frequently selected past choices and may enter their own…


We see a lot of this on the GutCheck tool, especially iterative development questions in our new IRCs. Love the idea of being flexible in qualitative interviewing — afterall, respondents are humans!

cocreationnews:

Jeffrey Henning of Affinnova writes in Research about crowd-shaped surveys — the process of refining a survey as it is being conducted in response to previous answers — with examples of techniques that can be used and surveys that have employed them. For example:

Where crowd-sourced choice lists really come into their own is in laddering. In qualitative interviewing, the laddering technique involves continually probing on answers to open-ended questions in order to move discussion from features to benefits and from benefits to emotions. This approach is particularly difficult to automate.

BrainJuicer has come up with a solution to this called MindReader. The first respondent is asked to provide a number of examples. For instance a respondent might be asked about their mobile phone: “What three features are most important to you?” Subsequent respondents see the most frequently selected past choices and may enter their own…

We see a lot of this on the GutCheck tool, especially iterative development questions in our new IRCs. Love the idea of being flexible in qualitative interviewing — afterall, respondents are humans!

(via socialintel)

Our CEO, Matt Warta, was on Radio New MR a couple of weeks ago, discussing innovation in qualitative research and DIY online tools. Click through for the interview.